NWRRI: Nevada Water Resources Research Institute

Success and the dedication to quality research have established the Division of Hydrologic Sciences (DHS) as the Nevada Water Resources Research Institute (NWRRI) under the Water Resources Research Act of 1984 (as amended).

About the WRRI program

The Water Resources Research Institutes (WRRI) are funded through the National Institutes for Water Resources (NIWR) for research, information transfer, training, and program management to help solve critical state water problems. A total of 54 institutes are located at colleges and universities in the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Under the Act, these institutes are to:

  1. Plan, conduct, or otherwise arrange for competent research that fosters:
    1. the entry of new research scientists into the water resources fields;
    2. the training and education of future water scientists, engineers, and technicians;
    3. the preliminary exploration of new ideas that address water problems or expand the understanding of water and water-related phenomena; and
    4. the dissemination of research results to water managers and the public.
  2. Coordinate closely with other colleges and universities in the state that have demonstrated capabilities for research, information dissemination, and graduate training to develop a statewide program designed to resolve state and regional water problems and related land issues.

DHS’s goals as the NWRRI

Nevada is the most arid state in the United States and it is experiencing significant population growth and possible future climate change. With competing water demands for agricultural, domestic, industrial, and environmental uses, issues surrounding water supply and quality are becoming more complex, which increases the need to develop and disseminate sound science to support informed decision making.

As the NWRRI, the continuing goals of DHS are to develop the water sciences knowledge and expertise that support Nevada’s water needs, encourage our nation to manage water more responsibly, and train students to become productive professionals. Therefore, DHS has chosen to make a valuable contribution to water research and education in Nevada by judiciously distributing its Section 104 research funds among numerous subject areas. Projects must be of significant scientific merit (as determined by the review process) and relevant to Nevada’s total water program to be considered worthy of funding.

To ensure collaboration and coordination among water-related entities throughout the state, DHS maintains a Statewide Advisory Council on Water Resources Research composed of leading water officials who may be called upon to assist in selecting the research projects that will be supported by Section 104 funds.