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DRI’s Alan Gertler awarded prestigious fellowship at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem

Reno, NV: Dr. Alan Gertler, DRI’s Vice President for Research and Chief Science Officer, has been named a 2017-2018 Lady Davis Fellow at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

The Lady Davis Fellowship Trustgertler, founded in 1973, provides funding for scholars in the international community to participate in research at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and at the Technion Institute of Technology in Haifa.

The fellowships offered by the trust are some of the most sought-after in the world. The application process is highly competitive – fewer than 10 percent of applicants are awarded a position.

“Internationally renowned senior scientists such as Nobel Prize winners usually get this fellowship,” noted Dr. Gertler. “It’s an honor and privilege to represent Nevada and the Desert Research Institute through this collaborative research program.”

This is just the latest of Dr. Gertler’s impressive list of appointments and honors, including his presidency of the International Union of Air of Pollution Prevention & Environmental Protection Agencies (IUAPPA) from 2007-2010 and recognition from the Nevada System of Higher Education as a Regent’s Researcher in 2009.

The Lady Davis Fellowship is part of Dr. Gertler’s year-long sabbatical beginning in July, his first in over 38 years as an atmospheric scientist at DRI. His sabbatical research will build on previous collaborations with faculty at the Hebrew University, which center around air quality research and management in Israel and the surrounding region.

Dr. Gertler’s sabbatical research will include such projects as applying differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS), which will help the scientific community develop a better understanding of atmospheric chemical processes leading to ozone formation in the troposphere. Dr. Gertler will also be working to complete the development of a microscopic chemical imaging (MCI) technology that will allow researchers to determine the sources of particle emissions in near real-time and expand knowledge of the impact these pollutants have on air quality and cloud physics.

An additional public outreach element of Dr. Gertler’s sabbatical will be to deliver a series of lectures during his time at the Hebrew University that build off his previous scholarship and connect to his current projects.

“Communicating the science of air quality and the impacts to society has always been an important part of my research,” he said, “and I look forward to sharing these new projects with the international academic community.”

Dr. Gertler and his wife Camille will depart for their year abroad on July 1st.